Blogs for Culture Vultures

Portsmouth Police turn to Translation Packs

Portsmouth Police turn to Translation Packs
The police in Portsmouth have taken an interesting approach to communicating with non-English speaking shoppers. As part of an initiative by Plymouth Against Retail Crime (Parc),  translation packs are being given to large stores, with some going to police patrol cars used around the city centre too.

The packs contain 13 cards, each carrying phrases in a foreign language and their English translation. Languages include Turkish, Spanish, Russian, Italian, French and Farsi. The cards can be used in situations where a foreigner needs help or is suspected of a crime in a store.

Although its a shame the cards are being used within the context of criminal activity it does demonstrate the understanding that simple actions such as phrases does make a difference. Wouldn't it be nice if staff could also get translation cards with simple greetings instead though?

Read more > Translation packs
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Portsmouth Police turn to Translation Packs

Portsmouth Police turn to Translation Packs
The police in Portsmouth have taken an interesting approach to communicating with non-English speaking shoppers. As part of an initiative by Plymouth Against Retail Crime (Parc),  translation packs are being given to large stores, with some going to police patrol cars used around the city centre too.

The packs contain 13 cards, each carrying phrases in a foreign language and their English translation. Languages include Turkish, Spanish, Russian, Italian, French and Farsi. The cards can be used in situations where a foreigner needs help or is suspected of a crime in a store.

Although its a shame the cards are being used within the context of criminal activity it does demonstrate the understanding that simple actions such as phrases does make a difference. Wouldn't it be nice if staff could also get translation cards with simple greetings instead though?

Read more > Translation packs
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Milkman shows ultimate Cross-Cultural Customer Service

Milkman shows ultimate Cross-Cultural Customer Service



"Cemcho bhai, harisani, ano chokra kabar?"

That is Gujarati for: "Hello brother, how are you? Any news about your son?"

Not too unusual as the start of a conversation in the heart of the Asian community in Blackburn, apart from the fact that the words are being spoken by a 69-year-old white, English-born milkman.

John Mather, aka Jimmy, has been doing the rounds in this north-west town for the past 50 years. And as he has gone from door-to-door in the town's large Asian community, he has become almost fluent in Gujarati.

"When I first started the rounds here there were only a handful of Asian families, about eight or 10, in the London Road, Whalley St and Altom St areas," says Jimmy.

But as more arrived on the foreign shores from Kenya and Malawi, Jimmy's ability to go beyond delivering just milk - and procure the sorts of foods they couldn't pick up in the local supermarket - put him in greater demand.

"They wanted natural yoghurt, ghee, goats and chickens, the type of things they were used to back home. I'd gone to the dairies here and they said that there wasn't the demand, but they couldn't have been more wrong."

Read more > BBC
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Milkman shows ultimate Cross-Cultural Customer Service

Milkman shows ultimate Cross-Cultural Customer Service



"Cemcho bhai, harisani, ano chokra kabar?"

That is Gujarati for: "Hello brother, how are you? Any news about your son?"

Not too unusual as the start of a conversation in the heart of the Asian community in Blackburn, apart from the fact that the words are being spoken by a 69-year-old white, English-born milkman.

John Mather, aka Jimmy, has been doing the rounds in this north-west town for the past 50 years. And as he has gone from door-to-door in the town's large Asian community, he has become almost fluent in Gujarati.

"When I first started the rounds here there were only a handful of Asian families, about eight or 10, in the London Road, Whalley St and Altom St areas," says Jimmy.

But as more arrived on the foreign shores from Kenya and Malawi, Jimmy's ability to go beyond delivering just milk - and procure the sorts of foods they couldn't pick up in the local supermarket - put him in greater demand.

"They wanted natural yoghurt, ghee, goats and chickens, the type of things they were used to back home. I'd gone to the dairies here and they said that there wasn't the demand, but they couldn't have been more wrong."

Read more > BBC
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Intercultural training materials for migrant workers

Intercultural training materials for migrant workers



On a construction site near the future Olympic village in east London, more than half of the workforce is Asian, about a third Central and Eastern European (including a large contingent of Bulgarians) and about 10% British.

In the canteen Sikhs sit with Sikhs, Lithuanians with Lithuanians and Brits with Brits. Communication is severely limited and it's not just language. Improving communication between communities at work is a major issue. Countries across the EU are experiencing the challenge of integrating migrant workers into their workplaces.

Now an EU iniative, the European Intercultural Workplace (EIW), addresses this challenge. Started by Dublin City University, the three-year project has a budget of $1.48m. It is one of the largest in the Leonardo da Vinci scheme, the EU mechanism for funding vocational education initiatives, and is part of the EU's current Year of Intercultural Dialogue.

The EIW involves vocational training centres and universities in 10 countries: Bulgaria, Finland, Greece, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Norway, Poland, Sweden, and Britain. Each partner has produced a national situation report, drawing together migrant workers' views on integration plus details of how employers and governments respond. There are also case studies looking at local sectors such as construction, retail and education.

A series of booklets explore intercultural issues on a transnational level with analysis of smaller-sized businesses, healthcare and education workplaces across Europe. A fourth booklet, Overview of Legislation, explains the legal situation in different countries. These reports are all available from the project website.

The data collected is impressive, but what will be of practical benefit to those working in intercultural communication – often starved of suitable teaching resources – are the EIW project's workplace educational training materials. These are available as a DVD/print package called Europe at Work.

The materials have been written and produced by the UK project team, led by Professor Emeritus Jack Lonergan of the University of Westminster. They have followed a critical incident methodology which presents scenarios on DVD and follow-up materials that promote discussion of possible solutions rather than providing a single answer.

"The scenarios have been scripted to focus on one specific issue which allows easy transfer to many similar situations. They have been filmed nowhere but apply anywhere," says Professor Lonergan.

One unit is called Appearance and reflects the issue of Muslim women wearing the veil at work. Seema, a Muslim accounts clerk, is selected for promotion by her human resources manager, Miss Tate. However, Miss Tate advises Seema that wearing a headscarf, or hijab, will not be appropriate in her more senior role. The scene plays out with Seema and Miss Tate's discussion.

Fourteen units, with accompanying print materials, deal with many areas of miscommunication at work between migrant and host-country workers. Most deal with the relations between bosses and staff concerning gender, religion, authority, time, race, qualifications and relationships.

Others deal with language issues such as failure to communicate, or being at a disadvantage because of language difficulties. One scene deals with body language. A young man is from a culture where he does not look elders in the eye out of respect for authority; he is suspected of dishonesty by a policeman because of his body language – his "shifty" manner.

The DVD scenarios make no recommendations and indeed come to no conclusions. It is for the work group to identify the issues, discuss possible solutions and come to an agreement.

The training manual supports the DVD scenario by helping viewers identify and understand the issues at stake and by inviting them to form their own opinions and discuss them with colleagues. An important part of each unit is the "What if... ?" scenes where students are taken through a series of situations and asked how they would deal with them. The accompanying best practice section suggests possible solutions that might be employed to resolve each situation.

Britain has a long history of migrants in the workplace, and therefore has experiences and expertise to share, but the EIW materials seek a wider perspective. Solutions found in Britain are not necessarily exportable and some issues may be dealt with more successfully elsewhere.

There is another spin off. Because of the immediacy of the issues, the naturalistic language and the subtitles in eight languages, the materials can also be used in language schools and colleges wanting workplace-based materials.

Original article from The Guardian
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"Cultural Competency Key to good Healthcare"

"Cultural Competency Key to good Healthcare"


On a day when SwedishAmerican Health System was celebrating attention to quality care, members of its physician resident and nursing staffs were learning how attention to cultural diversity can play into that quality.

Dr. Robert C. Like, professor and director of the Center for Healthy Families and Cultural Diversity in the Department of Family Medicine at Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in New Brunswick, N.J., spoke today at the hospital’s grand rounds about caring for patients from several ethnic, racial and sociocultural backgrounds as cultural competence in health care becomes more important in treating changing populations.

“A lot of people think of this as PC, or political correctness, run amok,” said Like, who traces his interest in cultural diversity back to hearing stories of his grandparents’ struggles after they immigrated to the United States from the former Soviet Union and Israel. “I like to think of PC as being personally and professionally caring.

“Doctors will ask ‘Do you expect me to learn about every culture on the planet?’ and the answer is ‘No, it’s not possible,’ but by communicating with each other we can learn.”

The aim, Like said, is elimination of all stereotypes.

Read more > rrstar.com
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"Cultural Competency Key to good Healthcare"

"Cultural Competency Key to good Healthcare"


On a day when SwedishAmerican Health System was celebrating attention to quality care, members of its physician resident and nursing staffs were learning how attention to cultural diversity can play into that quality.

Dr. Robert C. Like, professor and director of the Center for Healthy Families and Cultural Diversity in the Department of Family Medicine at Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in New Brunswick, N.J., spoke today at the hospital’s grand rounds about caring for patients from several ethnic, racial and sociocultural backgrounds as cultural competence in health care becomes more important in treating changing populations.

“A lot of people think of this as PC, or political correctness, run amok,” said Like, who traces his interest in cultural diversity back to hearing stories of his grandparents’ struggles after they immigrated to the United States from the former Soviet Union and Israel. “I like to think of PC as being personally and professionally caring.

“Doctors will ask ‘Do you expect me to learn about every culture on the planet?’ and the answer is ‘No, it’s not possible,’ but by communicating with each other we can learn.”

The aim, Like said, is elimination of all stereotypes.

Read more > rrstar.com
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Public Service Interpreting

Public Service Interpreting





It is easy to believe that interpreting is merely a case of translating one language for another. However, this is a misnomer particularly where public services are concerned. Interpreting is probably one of the most crucial and sought after need in the public service industry. From Social Services to housing, benefits and court interpreting, the process requires considerable other skills to that of understanding a particular language.
The Social Services department, particularly in cases of child protection require not only accurate translation during interpreting but sensitivity and, above all, confidentiality. Without those components the interpreting can be more of a casualty than a help. When for instance a child is to be received into the care of the local authority, a great deal of sensitivity is crucial on the part of the interpreter who is often the person to convey a very distressing message to a parent or relative. A good public service interpreter will also understand the importance of timing. The task of interpreting in the circumstances described above cannot be hurried. It is often necessary for a distressed person to take time out before commencing. Any interpreting undertaken for the Social Services in those circumstances should be preceded by an explanation to the client as to what he/she may expect and how it will be undertaken. The Social Services department should require a written undertaking of confidentiality and should further ensure that the interpreter is not known to the client in any capacity even living in the same vicinity.
Public service interpreting is also often used by the housing department particularly in multicultural areas where for many, English is not the first language, or where asylum seekers are concerned. This will also require a preliminary explanation to the client explaining the process that is to take place and also to explain the client’s rights and the limitations of any service required before the actual interview takes place.
Court interpreting also involves confidentiality and prior checks that the client is not known to the interpreter. It is sometimes the case that an interpreter is required urgently, particularly where someone who does not speak English has been arrested on a serious charge and is to be brought before Magistrates imminently. It is the task of the interpreter to explain to the client what is happening and what the charge is. The interpreter will be working with a solicitor who will explain everything to him/her. Most solicitors will become familiar with a translation service that provide good interpreters. A good Court translator will be experienced in working in the Courtroom and will have the appropriate public speaking skills. The interpreter will translate word for word which may well include swear words and abusive comments but interpreting means just that, interpreting exactly what is being said. The purpose of interpreting is to take the place of the person so that what is being translated is just as if the person was saying it themselves.
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The International Business of Language

The International Business of Language



Whilst the world is beginning to shrink with the opening up in communication and travel, so the world of business expands. In the last two decades never has there been such a need in the business world than to have a full, comprehensive knowledge and understanding of language and its impact across the globe. How much emphasis is given to language in your business? Language is the base communication throughout your business. Language transcends all in the business world. It is what makes the world the place it is and helps us to communicate with others.
Language as a tool in business should be seen as exactly that, a tool. Language should be as important to your business as your hard drives, your catalogues and manuals and all the other tools you perceive to be essential to conducting your business.

If you see language as a tool within your business you are more likely to foster the care and attention you need to place upon the way in which you use language. Perhaps you should adopt the mantra ‘language isn’t just for talking’. Language is for all communication. Some tips to help you to start using your tool of language in order to maximise your communication with your business counterparts. Firstly, you must be very clear and concise about the messages you wish to convey. Cut out the unnecessary words, don’t be convoluted about it, stick to the point and you will ensure you have been fully understood. Remember, and don’t forget, language is a tool and you want your tools to work for you. Personal style goes a long way to say something about you so don’t let the day’s stresses or any personal setbacks to show in the way you use your tool of language, believe it or not, a frown, a shortness or abruptness of manner can be off putting and leave the person with whom you are communicating feeling unsettled. Language is your business tool so, smile, make eye contact, it’s all part of the language. We call it body language.

It is extremely important in the world of business that your build good relationships. How do you do this? You use your language tool of course. It may seem like a time consuming exercise, may be even seen as patronising and pointless, but, if you are to succeed in fostering good, amicable and workable business relationships, a little training in how your company uses the language tool will not come amiss. Why not consider your own corporate brand of your valuable language tool? Why do you think the American’s use the phrase ‘have a nice day’? Because it works. Language says something about you. The language tool is your badge. Wear it well and you can’t go wrong.
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Working abroad 'requires translation of qualifications'

Working abroad 'requires translation of qualifications'



Professionals who are looking into the possibility of working abroad need to check that their qualifications "translate" into other countries.

According to expatriate and international lifestyle magazine Shelter Offshore, rules and regulations may also be different overseas, so professionals must ensure they do their research before deciding which country they wish to work in.

Rhiannon Davies, co-founder of Shelter Offshore, said professionals must also consider their own needs before making any firm plans.

She said: "If someone has a desire to live in a given country, they need to look at what businesses could work in that environment."

For example, a professional wanting to try working in Germany would need to carry out research into what type of business is successful in the country and where there may be a gap in the market.

Ms Davies was speaking after recent figures from the Office for National Statistics showed that there are almost three million full-time self-employed workers in the UK.

Read more > Shelter
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"Immigration changes will not cause UK skills exodus"

Multinational firms have rushed to the defence of immigration changes introduced last week, claiming the new rules will "make no difference" to UK employers' ability to attract overseas talent.

The new rules, which came into effect on 6 April, mean skilled migrant workers transferring from an overseas country to work at their company's British offices will no longer be able to clock up time spent in the UK to contribute towards the five years required to apply for permanent residence.

Employment lawyers and migrant campaign groups had warned the changes to the intra-company transfer (ICT) system could cause a skills exodus and put migrants off working in the UK.

Read more > Immigration
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EC plans Translation & Interpreting Rights

EC plans Translation & Interpreting Rights



All EU governments will be obliged to provide full interpretation and translation for criminal suspects under European Commission plans.

The idea is to help people "exercise their fair trial rights anywhere in the EU when they cannot understand the language of the case" said a statement.

The Commission cites the examples of an Italian tourist involved in a car crash in Sweden who was not allowed to talk to an Italian-speaking lawyer during his trial, and the Polish suspect denied access to written translations of evidence used against him in a French court.

Such "unexpected barriers" could lead to unfair convictions during legal proceedings in other EU countries.

The proposal - requested three months ago by EU ministers themselves - is the first step under the new Lisbon Treaty towards setting common EU standards in criminal cases.

The Treaty allows the EU to adopt measures "to strengthen the rights of EU citizens, in line with the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights", said the statement.

Read more > EU
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International Business Etiquette App for iPhone

 



Commisceo have today launched their first App for the iPhone.

The 'International Business Etiquette' App features information for business travellers on topics such as language, culture, etiquette and business protocol.

To download to your iPhone please go to the App Store and search under "international business etiquette".

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IHRM - Repatriation Management

IHRM - Repatriation Management



Despite ongoing concerns about high expatriate attrition rates companies do not seem to be paying a lot of attention to the repatriation phase. A similar observation can be made in HRM journals; whereas expatriation has been researched extensively during the last decades, repatriation has received scarce attention in literature. The purpose of this article is, therefore, to highlight the relevance of repatriation management in the earliest stages of expatriate management.

Recent research indicates that successful expatriation assignments rely on four elements: the selection of the candidates, pre-arrival preparation for both expatriate and family, the provided support and possibility to keep in touch with the home organization while on an expatriate assignment, and the repatriation arrangements after completion of the assignment (Baruch and Altman, 2002). That appropriate attention to repatriation arrangements is important follows out of various observations: (1) Valuable personnel frequently leave the organization relatively shortly after repatriation. Research findings from 2002 showed that about 50% of personnel left a financial services company within a few years following the return to their home country (Baruch & Altman, 2002).

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MoJ Translation Spend over £20 million

MoJ Translation Spend over £20 million



The Ministry of Justice admitted it has spent more than £20 million pounds on interpreters and translators in the last two years, fuelling concerns over the impact immigration is having on the public purse.

The figure included £11.8 million spent in 2007/08 which was higher than MPs had previously been told in a series of parliamentary written answers.

One, to Dominic Grieve, the shadow justice secretary, last year was more than £1 million short of the true figure, while Damian Green, the shadow immigration minister, was told spending had been £11.4 million.

Another, in 2008, only had figures for translation services and not interpreters while the fourth suggested more than £28 million had been spent in that year.

Read more > Telegraph
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Soft expatriates: Successful expatriation in a nutshell

Soft expatriates: Successful expatriation in a nutshell


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Barbie goes Multicultural

Barbie goes Multicultural



The look is part of an exhibition, backed by Barbie creator Mattel, of the doll in multicultural outfits by Italian designer Eliana Lorena.

Two of the Barbies are wearing the burka, the loose fitting robe with veiled holes for the eyes which is worn by some Muslim women.

The collection of more than 500 Barbies is being sold at a Sotheby's charity auction in Florence, Italy, in aid of Save The Children.

The sale is part of Barbie celebrations for her 50th anniversary this year.

Britain's biggest Barbie collector Angela Ellis, 35, who owns more than 250 dolls, said: "I think this is really important for girls, wherever they are from they should have the opportunity to play with a Barbie that they feel represents them.

"I Know Barbie was something seen as bad before as an image for girls, but in actual fact the message with Barbie for women is you can be whatever you want to be.

"I like the 70s, 80s and 90s ones that have reflected my life and I picked the really outstanding ones, the really different ones that have a message for my collection.

"I have a Barbie in a wheelchair that was only out for six weeks."

Read more > Barbie
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Which Language is Spoken Where?

At Commisceo we like to react to our customers needs. One thing we noticed with many of our valued translation and interpreting clients was that sometimes they were unsure as to what languages are spoken in which countries.

So what do we do? We invent a little widget that answers this for them in a second! The widget can be added to their own site and will soon also become a Google Widget (watch this space).

SORRY NO LONGER AVAILABLE

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Expat Children - Third Culture Kids

Expat Children - Third Culture Kids



In a world where international careers are becoming commonplace, the phenomenon of third culture kids (TCKs) – children who spend a significant portion of their developmental years in a culture outside their parents’ passport culture(s) – is increasing exponentially. Not only is their number increasing, but the cultural complexity and relevance of their experience and the adult TCKs (ATCKs) they become, is also growing.

When Ruth Hill Useem, a sociologist, first coined this term in the 1950s, she spent a year researching expatriates in India. She discovered that folks who came from their home (or first) culture and moved to a host (or second) culture, had, in reality, formed a culture, or lifestyle, different from either the first or second cultures. She called this the third culture and the children who grew up in this lifestyle third culture kids. At that time, most expatriate families had parents from the same culture and they often remained in one host culture while overseas.

This is no longer the case. Take, for example, Brice Royer, the founder of TCKid.com. His father is a half-French/half-Vietnamese UN peacekeeper while his mom is Ethiopian. Brice lived in seven countries before he was eighteen including France, Mayotte, La Reunion, Ethiopia, Egypt, Canada, and England. He writes, “When people ask me ‘Where are you from?,’ I just joke around and say, ‘My mom says I’m from heaven’.” What other answer can he give?

Read more > Telegraph
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HealthForumOnline Adds Cultural Competency to their Online Education

HealthForumOnline Adds Cultural Competency to their Online Education
HealthForumOnline (HFO), a nationally-approved (APA, ASWB, NBCC, PSNA, CA-BBS) provider of online continuing education (CE) for psychologists, social workers, counselors, nurses and other allied healthcare professionals announces the addition of a new online CE course for health professionals working with children and their families, Cultural Competency in Pediatric Psychology: Issues & Clinical Applications to their extensive online continuing education library.

This addition to HFO's online CE course selection is important as psychologists, social workers, counselors, nurses and other allied health care professionals in the U.S. have had a growing awareness of a shift in the demographic characteristics of their pediatric patients and their families over the last decade. Among them, is a marked change indicating a growing trend towards a more multi-ethnic society. However, despite this demographic shift, evidence suggests that Americans still do not equally share in the hope for recovery from mental illness despite the availability of effective and well-documented treatments.

Although a decade has passed since the U.S. Surgeon General first asserted that culture counts in mental health research and treatment, little has been done to address cultural variables in any way. One review of the research literature reported that only 11% of American samples included minority participants (i.e., African Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanics), only18% reported the SES of participants, and only 6% discussed potential moderating cultural variables such as a specific ethnic-related variable. Moreover, the existing literature typically focuses on adults, further limiting our ability to offer theory- and evidence-based interventions that are culturally sensitive to an entire population base - children and their families. Not surprisingly, U.S. minorities, particularly children, continue to face obstacles to accessing mental health care, including barriers related to language, geography and cultural familiarity, resulting in culturally-based disparities in the quality of care received and mental health outcome.

Read more > HFO
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